Bright Wall/Dark Room.
1 year ago
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Excerpt from Bright Wall/Dark Room Magazine, Issue #1: Michelle Said on Tokyo Story (1953):

I don’t know when it happened, but I’ve recently become the kind of person who cries at commercials. “Crying” is actually an inaccurate term for it—it’s something more akin to “A swelling of emotion that amounts to my eyes becoming wet but no tears actually falling.” Perhaps in another era we called it “getting misty.”
So lately I’ve been getting misty at commercials.
There’s this one commercial, maybe you’ve seen it? If I just say, “I’ve seen this one commercial and it’s making me misty,” you probably know the one I’m talking about: the Google Chrome ad where the father and daughter communicate via all these great modern technological wonders. The father is a widower and his daughter is off to college and we see snippets of their conversations. They have video chat dates, she introduces her boyfriend to him. The daughter is homesick, the father misses his daughter, misses his wife. They stay connected via the warm glow of the Internet.
“That is so. BEAUTIFUL,” I say, mistily. Then the commercial changes and my eyes are dry again.

Read the rest of this essay by subscribing to Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine directly from your iPhone or iPad.

Excerpt from Bright Wall/Dark Room Magazine, Issue #1: Michelle Said on Tokyo Story (1953):

I don’t know when it happened, but I’ve recently become the kind of person who cries at commercials. “Crying” is actually an inaccurate term for it—it’s something more akin to “A swelling of emotion that amounts to my eyes becoming wet but no tears actually falling.” Perhaps in another era we called it “getting misty.”

So lately I’ve been getting misty at commercials.

There’s this one commercial, maybe you’ve seen it? If I just say, “I’ve seen this one commercial and it’s making me misty,” you probably know the one I’m talking about: the Google Chrome ad where the father and daughter communicate via all these great modern technological wonders. The father is a widower and his daughter is off to college and we see snippets of their conversations. They have video chat dates, she introduces her boyfriend to him. The daughter is homesick, the father misses his daughter, misses his wife. They stay connected via the warm glow of the Internet.

“That is so. BEAUTIFUL,” I say, mistily. Then the commercial changes and my eyes are dry again.

Read the rest of this essay by subscribing to Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine directly from your iPhone or iPad.

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