Arielle Greenberg


Tommy (1975)
Issue 40: Faith

Ain't You Somethin'
Sugarland Express
Issue 37: Steven Spielberg

Life is Short
Amy
Issue 36: Identity

How Could It Not Know What It Is?
Blade Runner
Issue 35: Sci-Fi

Thirteen Ways of Looking at The Duke of Burgundy
The Duke of Burgundy
Issue 34: LGBTQ

Mattie Ross
True Grit
Issue 33: The Coen Brothers

Criss-Cross
Strangers on a Train
Issue 30: Alfred Hitchcock

“This Isn’t like Any Other Profession Out There”
Issue 29: Lenses

Wasted Youth
Fast Times at Ridgemont High
Issue 28: Teenagers

American Accent, Pixie Haircut: Instructions for a Translation of New York to Paris, via The Herald Tribune
A Bout de Souffle
Issue 27: Paris

Moon Tower
Dazed and Confused
Issue 26: Summer

The Real Thing! Insight!
Issue 25: Dilemmas

Lay Me Down in Sheets of Linen
Almost Famous
Issue 22: Music, pt. 2: Musicians & Fans

We Are the Best!
We Are the Best!
Issue 21: Music, pt. 1: Musicals and Soundtracks

Scoring
Carnal Knowledge
Issue 20: Mike Nichols

You Sure Are a Secret Man
Out of the Past
Issue 18: Noir

Top Twenty(ish) Horror Movies I Am Too Frightened to See (But Fully Imagine All the Damn Time): An Exorcism
Issue 17: Fear

Dear Diary
Heathers
Issue 16: School

I've Never Been Much Good
Gun Crazy
Issue 15: Americana, pt. II

The State Bird's the Meadowlark
Badlands
Issue 14: Americana

Arielle Greenberg is the Resident Poet at Bright Wall/Dark Room. She is the co-author of Home/Birth: A Poemic; author of My Kafka Century and Given; and co-editor of three anthologies, including Gurlesque. She lives in Maine and teaches in the community and in Oregon State University-Cascades' MFA program. Arielle writes a regular column on contemporary poetics for the American Poetry Review.

Arielle Greenberg is the Resident Poet at Bright Wall/Dark Room. She is the co-author of Home/Birth: A Poemic; author of My Kafka Century and Given; and co-editor of three anthologies, including Gurlesque. She lives in Maine and teaches in the community and in Oregon State University-Cascades' MFA program. Arielle writes a regular column on contemporary poetics for the American Poetry Review.